Monday, July 11, 2016

Lanier Ramer


Scientology is one of those doctrines that scares the crap out of me.  It's not so much what I know about the organization, it's what I don't know.  Much to the dismay of the folks at Scientology headquarters Charles Manson, Bruce Davis and even Steve Grogan have been linked to them.  Scientology is pretty well known for trying to cover up any unpleasant connections that they perceive will make them look bad.

Scientology could not back away fast enough from any hint of anyone in the Manson Family having studied their teachings.  Fortunately for us there are any number of ex-Scientologists that are willing to spill the beans and provide documents showing that there was indeed something to a Scientology/Charles Manson connection.  Just Google Charles Manson and Scientology and you'll get tons of hits.

Manson was introduced to Scientology while at McNeil Island Federal Prison by Lainer Ramer who was doing a stint with the Feds for bank robbery.  While I do not know exactly how Ramer got hooked up with Scientology to begin with I do know that he taught what he knew to other prisoners. There is information that Scientology had a prison outreach program in the early days but that is hard to nail down in print.  Ramer was pretty much a career criminal having done a few terms in prison so I have to wonder why Scientology would cultivate him as a member in the first place.  I guess any organization needs its henchmen to do the dirty deeds where the higher-ups don't want to dirty their hands.  Maybe that was their plan for Ramer, get him to recruit people who were not afraid of doing something illegal.

Scientology seemed to endure the rumors that Manson had studied their teachings, all the while denying that he was ever a member, during the TLB trial phase but when it came to Lynette Fromme and her trial they started to freak out.  Lanier Ramer was subpoenaed to testify at the trial about Lynette having asked him if he could get her a gun in the months before the assassination attempt on President Ford.

I suppose that the powers that be at Scientology were afraid that Ramer's connection to Lynette and Charlie would come out in court, under oath and recorded in the court documents for all time.  They really couldn't have that and worked some overtime on damage control.  I have to hand it to them, they really did their homework on Ramer.  They dug up facts about him that would have been herculean in the 70s with no internet, no Ancestry.com, no newspaper archives etc.  They had him pegged,  from birth.
Scientology drew up a "Time Track" on Ramer to assess how they were going to tackle the problem.









Next they drew up a list of possibilities highlighting items in Ramer's Time Track that could possibly be spun to distance themselves from both Ramer and Manson.  Note in #2 they allude to Manson perhaps being fed LSD, presumably a la Project MKUltra.  They end the Possibilities with a paranoid statement that perhaps it was government  who set up Scientology to make them look bad.


The last of the Scientology documents is a letter that Ramer was made to sign disavowing that he was ever an "agent" of Scientology.


These are some newspaper articles that tell of the bank robberies and related crimes Ramer committed back in the 50s and 60s that landed him federal prison. 





Ramer did eventually, after years in prison, carve a niche for himself by becoming a prisoner's rights activist.  It was because of the strides that he made in this area that he did not want to testify in Lynette's trial.  He had been working for a politician in New York at the time of Lynette's trial and was afraid it would affect his work and the politician negatively.  In the end, it did.

Ramer died in 1980 in Wisconsin where he lived with his wife and children.  Unfortunately I have no idea how he died, getting death certificates from Wisconsin is next to impossible.  He was only 48 years old.







62 comments:

St Circumstance said...

Well done as always Deb...

I can tell you what the outreach program developed into today...


Criminon, meaning “no crime,” is a volunteer criminal rehabilitation program which utilizes technologies developed by L. Ron Hubbard to help convicts recover pride and self-esteem. Today Criminon operates in more than 2,000 prisons, assisting some 100,000 inmates, through correspondence courses or delivering on-site seminars, with remarkable results.

Criminon provides inmates with the knowledge and skills to change their lives and become productive members of society. Inmates who have completed the Criminon program show dramatic improvements in compliance with conditions of probation—including restitution, fine payment and community service. Criminon is further known to cut 80 percent recidivism rates to zero and entirely eradicate cellblock violence. The program is so successful, in many cases it is mandated nationally across entire prison systems....

Manson Mythos said...

Ramer "audited" Manson in prison, supposedly. However, you to be auited by somebody who is certified to due so after paying the fees, of course. So Charlie was never an official member of Scientology.

The rumor of the involvement of The Process Church of the Final Judgement, who has grown into a jungle of bullshit was the result of Scientology's smear champagne against the founders of The Process.

Vermouth Brilliantine said...

Deb the Detective! My eyes went wide as saucers when I saw all the digging done by DCI Deb. Very impressive stuff.

As for Scientology, blech. Maybe Criminon works well for people. It's not impossible for religious-based rehabilitation programs to provide genuine aid, education, and social work- the Catholic Church, for all its faults, is still the world's biggest non-government provider of education & medical care. Scientology ain't Catholicism, though. L. Ron Hubbard was a supervillain come to life, with his own uniformed henchman (the Sea Org), his own evil lairs (the 'Apollo' ship and 'Gold Base' in California), his own long list of murders and ruined lives & corrupted state institutions behind him. He was kind of a successful version of Charlie, with less nihilism and more old-fashioned Americana hucksterism.

I wonder how much of an impact Charlie would have made without Mr. Ramer? How many more potential Charlies are being given The Skills They Need right now through Criminon programs? Maybe I am putting too much blame on Scientology- Charlie (and other Charlies to follow) would & will probably con & kill without Scientologist influence. Maybe if Charlie had been involved with a charismatic con Pentecostal he'd have absorbed similar social control & psychological tricks, just from a different source. Who knows?

HellzBellz said...

Here in the Netherlands, We have a ,,Hit-Man,, in Jail for life who is also envolved in Criminon. And was envolved in Scientology way before he was ratted out by a Fellow Hit-Man who made a deal with the Justice System here as a Crown Witness and is in the Witness protection program.. The guy Himself has written a book about it all, but its in somekinda investigation by Justice IF ever allowed to publice.

Shorty's pistols said...

Fantastic work, Deb. I read thru the material and it reveals a lot of stuff I had wondered about. On the base level, I discovered I had been mistaken on the spelling of Ramer's name. I had seen it spelled Raimer and Raymer, neither of which were accurate.

He is an interesting guy. He really seem to like to rob banks in his younger days. Rob a bank and walk down the street and have a beer. Not a great plan.

Robert Hendrickson said...

DEB: I don't remember if I mentioned this before, but Merrick was really into L. Ron Hubard Dianetics. He was also involved with "prisoner" reprograming sessions. and so likely it was the "Criminon" prison business. This was even before Charlie Manson rose to fame.

He also used the Dianetics teachings in his acting class and recommended the Dianetics book to all his students. This is really interesting because HE apparently didn't even understand the old adage that: 50% of something is better than 100% of nothing.

AND HE also had a typical "criminal" mentality marked by self "entitlement."

BUT he was also smart enough to arm himself with lawyers to escape jail time. For ME Merrick was a real case study in underlying human 'criminal' nature and to this day I am STILL so very interested in WHY we do the things we do. Especially, WHY do otherwise upstanding citizens perform such mentally deficient actions.

Of course, we all love the He's just "EVIL" label, because it relieves us of any further investigation, BUT modern science, DNA and societies "brainwashing" programs make the old Hoka Pocus teachings obsolete.

St Circumstance said...

Some lady wrote a great article about Scientology in the Prison systems:

America has a huge problem with pseudoscience in its addiction-treatment programs, especially when those programs are court-mandated for folks trying to avoid jail time as a result of drug charges. To take one example I noted recently — drawn from Maia Szalavitz’s excellent new book Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction — many such programs rely on the harmful, thoroughly outdated notion that folks struggling with addiction need to “hit rock bottom” before they can get better.

For another recent example — a bizarre one involving Scientology — read this article at the drug- and addiction-oriented publication The Influence by associate editor Sarah Beller. Beller’s article helpfully traces the origins of “Moral Reconation Therapy,” which she describes as the “primary drug treatment [program] used in the US criminal justice system.” And yet MRT is a program, Beller explains, that basically no bona fide addiction experts have heard of or view as empirically supported (even though it’s listed, as she notes, on the U.S. government’s registry of “evidence-based” addiction-treatment programs).

Beller’s article is one of those thorough investigative pieces that is hard to sum up, but one part jumps out as particularly bizarre and is worth highlighting. Beller discovered that MRT’s primary text given to every participant in the program, How To Escape Your Prison, relies in part on the idea of a “freedom ladder.” “Immediately upon your birth, you ‘fell from grace’ and began your descent down the freedom ladder,” explains the text, according to Beller. Presumably, those suffering from addiction must climb up the freedom ladder to escape their condition.

Where did this idea come from? I’ll let Beller take it from here:

When the word “Scientology” began cropping up in my searches in connection with Smothermon, I delved deeper, and suddenly noticed a shocking similarity, one that was clearly not coincidental: MRT’s Freedom Ladder is an almost direct replica of Scientology’s “Life Conditions.”

Both include the stages, in the same descending order, of: “Normal,” “Emergency,” “Danger,” and “Non-Existence.” Then, Scientology has “Liability, while MRT has “Injury;” Scientology has “Doubt” while MRT has “Uncertainty;” and last, Scientology has “Treason” where MRT has “Disloyalty.”

The Scientology Handbook says that the “conditions” are “states of existence.” There is something called the “ethics conditions” which “identify these states and provide formulas—exact steps which one can use to move from one condition to another higher and more survival condition.”

“Ethics is the means by which he can raise himself to a higher condition and improve his survival.”

Beller is measured in her argument — she notes that MRT “seems to have left behind” various excesses of Scientology. “And overall,” she writes, “MRT seems less like a part of some nefarious Scientology plot to infiltrate the prison system, more a mish-mash of psychobabble picked haphazardly from 1970s self-actualization talk, Christianity, AA and yes, Scientology.” Still: It’s mind-boggling to think that this is the foundation for treatment of countless Americans struggling with addiction, that they’re being ordered by the court system to “climb” a “freedom ladder” ensconced in Scientological eschatology.

If you want to learn more about this “treatment” “program” from How To Escape Your Prison — well, you can’t. “When I tried to order some books from [the company that administers MRT to prisoner’s] website, I was informed that only people who have undergone the patented MRT training can even order the book,” said Beller. “Basic trainings cost around $600 to attend.” Oh well — I’m sure it works great.

HellzBellz said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciupsqkLLkQ

orwhut said...

Thank you, HellzBellz.

Robert Hendrickson said...

Sunday I saw portions of a "border" doc and something stood-out. In a border down there are usually a lot of dogs, mostly stray "street" dogs.

So this regular dog catcher guy explained: The dogs that actually have a home and a master learn the THOUGHT that THEIR home and yard is THEIR turf and they will be aggressive to protect it.

Street dogs, on the other hand, have NO real home and thus are NOT aggressive, as they have NOTHING to protect.

AND then you have "home" dogs that get out of THEIR yard and soon develop the idea that the whole "block" in which they roam is THEIR territory and then become very aggressive in protecting the whole block. Then enter the mailman on that block and BINGO, we got trouble.

Is this NOT just like the animal known as man ? IE: does it NOT just boil down to "animal" instincts prevail through-out OUR society, EXCEPT we elect LAWS to stifle OUR natural way of life. Kind'a makes sense to ME.

Robert Hendrickson said...

Hey folks, I just thought of something. Like Deb says, she doesn't know that much about Scientology, and I don't either - so does anyone know what that organization's position on the BLACK & WHITE conflict is ? Like, is there anything taught by THEM that could be thought to be supporting one side or another ?

St Circumstance said...

The Church of Scientology's worldview revolves around "white privilege" (the idea that racism is not only something that puts others at a disadvantage but also confers certain, unspoken advantages on whites). Its whole philosophy is built solidly upon Hubbard's racial and cultural biases and paternalistic views.

Well, part of it may also be that the structure of Scn, which is very white, may not be as appealing to those who are not.

By this I mean the linear-thought patterns[,] graphs and charts and grades, all written-culture worship of His Written Words and dominant culture ideas of individual advancement, paying for wisdom with money, some of Hubbard's 1950s leftovers about patriarchal and white superiority, even down to the military heirarchy [sic], etc.

I'm not saying that all nonwhites would feel alienated by these and other aspects of Scn, but there are so many cultural biases within the Scn construct that it is identifiable as such, no matter how non-biased it wants to believe itself to be, and how diverse it tries to pass itself off.

-M. C. DiPietra, ARS post "Re: Is scientology a racist organization?, May 2000

Jesse Prince, a former high-ranking official in the Church of Scientology, said of that "Hubbard could not conceive of a colored man like me of being so intelligent."

In a radio interview, Mr. Prince mentions that the current head of the Church, David Miscavige, is racist. Such racism in the leadership, even when not expressed publicly, tends to permeate the entire organization, allowing prejudices to go unchallenged.

JP [Jesse Prince]: You know, and it's also ironic that they would target the African-American community because the current leader of Scientology, David Miscavige, is a racist, a racist in extremis, as well as his South African companion, Norman Starkey. I was the only African-American that I know of that ever achieved a high position within Scientology. And even then, I was continually subjected to racial slurs by David Miscavige and, um, Norman Starkey to the point where we nearly came to blows about it.

HOST: What kind of racial slurs?

JP: "Nigger", "dumb nigger", this kind of—constantly.

St Circumstance said...

A "Great Story" was posted to the alt.religion.scientology newsgroup as an example of a Scientology Big Win [glossary], probably to demonstrate to critics and "raw meat [glossary]" the remarkable effects of the Scientology "tech". What it actually demonstrates is that these Scientologists are blind to their own racism. Whether they brought their prejudices with them when they joined the Church or developed them while members, this story shows how racism is not only tolerated but applauded.

Here's an excellent example of what a single Scientologist can do in their immediate environment — no matter how "dangerous" it may appear on the surface — might tickle your funny bone too. Sent to me by a friend.

Enjoy: […]

Suddenly I saw this huge black guy (he literally dwarfed me) who was trying to sell crack to 4 young girls. I barged in, sent the girls away, and confronted the dealer. I held a Way to Happiness book up to his face and told him he needed to read this. He was impolite (to put it mildly) … threatened to kick my head in, and I just told him I'd get back up and tell him he needed to read this again. He threatened to kill me and I said, 'That's fine. I'll haunt you the rest of your life, and tell you need to read this.' He then asked if I was mad [insane] and I said more than likely. Eventually, he took the book and read a page or 2. Then he said, 'I'm going home. I've got to read ALL of this. And took my name and phone number.

This is a classic example of the Brute Caricature, a common racist image that the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia [offsite] describes as "portray[ing] Black men as innately savage … and criminal…. Black brutes are depicted as … terrifying predators who target helpless victims, especially White women."

Jounalist Ian Halperin asked a Scientology recruiter in Los Angeles who L. Ron Hubbard might vote for in the 2008 US presidential elections. He quotes the Scientologist as saying:

I can tell you who shouldn't be President — Barack Obama, Condoleezza Rice and the Reverend Al Sharpton. They should not be allowed to run for office, they should be sweeping the office.

St Circumstance said...

If this Scientologist was a racist before coming to Scientology, he has found acceptance within the Church. His attitude reflects Hubbard's own views, which are Scientology religious doctrine. "Sweeping the office" is eerily similar to Hubbard's advice to his wife to "get a nigger" to scrub her floors.

If the gentleman was not a racist before, Scientology made him one. All Scientologists are expected to support Source without question and are strongly influenced (some say brainwashed) by Hubbard's perspectives; i.e., Hubbard's Words = Truth, as former Scientologist Anthony explains:

But to believe in scientology means to believe that the Zulus (and all Africans) are savage, that the Japanese are insane because of their language (from a 1950 lecture), that the yogis are practicing mind-damaging techniques, etc., etc. I don't believe these things, and really thinking about these things, I suddenly found the range of things Hubbard said I disagreed with become huge.

Whereas before I had read his books and lecture transcripts as if they were gospel, suddenly they seemed dry, lifeless. I am ashamed for defending what Hubbard said now, especially as it implicates me as agreeing with the racist comments of a racist.

-Anthony, ARS post "Hubbard the Racist, December 1997

Another former Scientologist describes his transformation under the Scientology's tutelage:

It was only after reading L Ron Hubbard that my viewpoint on the races of man began to be tested. Before that I did not have attention on any race and did not judge a book by its cover. I had friends of all shades and beliefs. …

There was a time when I was like Hubbard and saw others as a threat to my children's gene pool.

-Creed J. Pearson, L Ron Hubbard the Racist, Part VI of the Discovering Scientology's Greatest Secrets series

St Circumstance said...

author Chris Owen describes a leading Scientologist's view of South African resources available for exploitation:

The Scientologist in question was U. Keith Gerry, who was definitely a favored associate of Hubbard: in 1955 he had collaborated with Hubbard to produce an anthology of Hubbardian thought entitled The Key to Tomorrow. In a late 1950s issue of Ability magazine he wrote an article entitled "How It Is Going In South Africa". This makes abundantly clear what Scientology's approach was in South Africa. Remember, this was approved by L. Ron Hubbard himself: he was happy to endorse a racist and discriminatory approach despite his claimed commitment to equality:

Note: Voortrekkers were Dutch settlers in South Africa who migrated into the interior of the country from 1836 onwards, in order to live outside of British rule.

[…] For anyone who wishes to see action, South Africa is going to be an intensely interesting country in the next few years. We are not trying to patch up an old order but we are going to create a new one in a land with vast natural resources, with an active people who still retain that streak of courage and enthusiasm which led the voortrekkers into the unknown, with a vast number of natives who would be happy working with their hands for understanding employers, with an ideal climate and with the geographical position which can lead the whole of Africa to a happy and united future.

St Circumstance said...

Hubbard's biases were evident from an early age — demonstrated by his journal entries as a teenager — and persisted into adulthood, appearing in his fictional writings preceding Scientology. In 1949, mathematician/author Chandler Davis [offsite] wrote a letter for the Vanguard Amateur Press Association suggesting that "It's not satisfactory for all the characters in stories obviously to be white and have Anglo-Saxon names." As might be expected, the letter generated considerable discussion and disagreement. Davis had chosen a Hubbard story, The Automagic Horse, to use as "a hard example" of stereotyping. Hubbard did not respond with a discussion or agrument; instead he retaliated by changing the name of the villain in another story to "Chan Davies" and made him a communist.

For a church that espouses the equality for all races, colors, and creeds, there is a definite lack of black (and other minority) members, as a number of people have observed:

At any rate, a wide variety of people of different ages and with both sexes well represented. One curiosity was that I don't recall seeing any non-Caucasians, though there must have been a couple hundred people in the Castle building.

-Chris Owen, "Ron's Underpants: a visit to Saint Hil

St Circumstance said...

There is a little for you MR. H

St Circumstance said...

I dont want to hijack Debs post, but I know little about this subject. Her are some L.Ron Hubbard quotes for you:


* Actually, have you ever noticed how a Negro, in particular down south, where they're pretty close to the soil, personifies MEST? The gate post and the wagon and the whip and anything around there. A hat -- they talk to 'em, you know. "Wassa madda wit you, hat?" They imbue them with personality. -- L. Ron Hubbard, "Therapy" section of Technique 80 ("Route to Infinity" tapes), Part I, a lecture given on 21 May 1952

* The South African native is probably the one impossible person to train in the entire world he is probably impossible by any human standard.-- L. Ron Hubbard, PAB No. 119, 1 September 1957, as published in Level 0 PABS (c.1968, The American St. Hill Organization).

* As long as a white foreman is there, they will prevent soil erosion; but the moment that a white foreman turns his back boo! There goes the whole program. And you finally get up to the point of where he's [native] supposed to take care of something, a lesson which has never been taught to the native of South Africa.-- L. Ron Hubbard, 15th ACC (Power of Simplicity) lecture "Education: Point of Agreement", 30 Oct 1956.

* The insanity rate per capita in South Africa is appalling. it is easily seen that a primary requisite in any programme of the rehabilitation of the Bantu in South Africa would be mental health Hubbard, HCOB April 1960, "The Scientific Treatment of the Insane"

* [Y]ou'll find in Africans a fantastic amount of heavy space opera and so on, going on which makes the colored African very, very interesting to process because he doesn't know why he goes through all these dances and why he feels so barbarous.-- L. Ron Hubbard, 1st Melbourne ACC, lecture "Principal Incidents on the Track", 27 November 1959.

* They took people who were totally dedicated to certain tribal procedures and said, "You're free." And they said, "Free. Free? Free. Ah! You mean there's no police anymore." Boom! Boom!-- L. Ron Hubbard, State of Man Congress, Opening lecture, 1 January 1960...

* The African tribesman, with his complete contempt for truth and his emphasis on brutality and savagery for others but not for himself, is a no-civilization. L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology: The Fundamentals of Thought, Bridge Publications: Los Angeles, 1997.

* The Zulu is only outside the bars of a madhouse because there are no madhouses provided by his tribe. primitives are far more aberrated than civilized peoples. Their savageness, their unprogressiveness, their incidence of illness. -- L. Ron Hubbard, Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, Bridge Publications, Los Angeles, 1995.

St Circumstance said...

Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard’s views are shockingly racist to modern sensibilities, but were common in white society during much of his life. Hubbard’s prejudices, however, are forever codified in Source, i.e., they are sacred, immutable doctrine. Scientology refuses to make a disclaimer or add a footnote to any of Hubbard’s racist remarks, let alone change them, and yet they reprint his books again and again. All these years later, not one Scientologist in the world would dare to say "Hubbard was wrong." Hence, Scientology is inherently racist, as the following collection of "scriptural" quotes illustrates.

A basic component of Scientology’s services is auditing (counseling sessions). Through a progression of special auditing actions for specific purposes, called rundowns, Scientologists can advance their "spiritual" condition. But Hubbard has a Big Auditing Problem with native South Africans, who, along with other "primitives" and children, are in a "retrograded" state:

The South African native is probably the one impossible person to train in the entire world — he is probably impossible by any human standard.

–L. Ron Hubbard, PAB No. 119, 1 September 1957, as published in Level 0 PABS (c.1968, The American St. Hill Organization).


last one :)

St Circumstance said...

ahhh forgive me Deb lol this is my favorite subject :)


What you should really know about Scientology is that is based on Satanism. The symbols the numeric system... L.Ron got alot of his ideas from Crowley...


In Hubbard's 1952 Philadelphia Doctorate Course Lectures, he states:

"The magical cults of the 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th centuries in the Middle East were fascinating. The only modern work that has anything to do with them is a trifle wild in spots, but is a fascinating work in itself, and that's the work of Aleister Crowley - the late Aleister Crowley - my very good friend.... He signs himself 'the Beast,' mark of the Beast 666..."

And even as late as 1958, he was trying to tell us where he got his OT information:

"But mysticism/occultism isn't our source. Our source, actually, is magic. Magic is something that, today, is performed on a stage with prestidigitation. But magic actually has a much more vivid and noble history than a stage magician. It is quite remarkable that the magician attempts directly to use spirits to perform his will. And that is his basic modus operandi. That is his goal in practicing magic." from a Lecture given on 29 January 1958, The History of Clearing by L Ron Hubbard.

And even in the OT materials he claims that he came to fulfill the prophecy of the Anti-Christ. Wow! It won't come as a big shock to anyone who has researched Hubbard's life. Many of us already know about the time he was involved in the Babylon Workings. In case you haven't heard about it:


Hubbard was clearly involved in the occult. In 1945, L. Ron Hubbard met Jack Parsons, who was a renowned scientist, protegee of occultist Aleister Crowley, and a member of the notorious Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.), an international organization founded by Crowley to practice sexual black magic.

Parsons had Hubbard move onto the property of Parsons' Pasadena, California, home. It was there that Hubbard began to practice the occult and sexual magic. Parsons' mistress, Sara Northrup, left him for Hubbard and later became Hubbard's second wife, even before Hubbard had divorced his first wife (The Los Angeles Times, June 24, 1990, p. A37).

Biographer Russell Miller wrote, "Parsons considered that Ron had great magical potential and took the risk of breaking his solemn oath of secrecy to acquaint Ron with some of the O.T.O. rituals.... Parsons wrote to his 'Most Beloved Father' (his term for Aleister Crowley) to acquaint him with events: 'About three months ago I met Captain L. Ron Hubbard.... Although he has no formal training in Magick, he has an extraordinary amount of experience and understanding in the field. From some of his experiences I deduced that he is in direct touch with some higher intelligence, possibly his Guardian Angel. He describes his Angel as a beautiful winged woman with red hair whom he calls the Empress and who has guided him through his life and saved him many times. He is the most Thelemic [self-willed, independent] person I have ever met and is in complete accord with our own principles'" (Russell Miller, Bare-Faced Messiah: the True Story of L. Ron Hubbard, 1987, pp. 117-8,).

"Parsons wanted to attempt an experiment in black magic that would push back the frontiers of the occult world. With the assistance of his new friend, he intended to try and create a 'moonchild' - the magical child 'mightier than all the kings of the earth,' whose birth had been prophesied in The Book of the Law more than forty years earlier"

St Circumstance said...

Many of the methods and ideology that Hubbard used in Scientology are taken from other sources. The mixture of using different teachings has long been associated to include the occult, since it is a known fact that L Ron Hubbard was familiar with the writings of "black magician," Aleister Crowley's work since Hubbard was a teen.

Crowley, a self-declared "beast" and "anti-Christ," once headed the British "Ordo Templi Orientis," (OTO) branch, and established those teachings in the United States in 1916, during World War I in Europe. Crowley's OTO teachings of magick included the Golden Dawn and that of Thelemic Law.

Influences of Aleister Crowley are found in Scientology "technology," or teaching materials - including L Ron Hubbard's own admission that he was the "anti-Christ." Aleister Crowley died in 1947. But in 1969, the same year that Scientology donned the crosses and minister's garb, was the same time that the "Thoth Tarot Card Deck" was published and sold, (a product produced years before, by Aleister Crowley with artist Lady Frieda Harris, (deceased in 1962.) This was the same year that L Ron Hubbard directed members to bring in the crossed out cross and wear minister's clothing.


St Circumstance said...

Significantly, this symbol is used in Aleister Crowley's "THE FOOL" Tarot Card in ways that reflect the Golden Dawn Teachings. There is also visible a faint S after 'The Fool' on the card above which looks much like the typeface used for the S in Scientology...

"In his 1952 lectures, Hubbard also referred to the Tarot cards, saying that they were not simply a system of divination but a "philosophical machine". He gave particular mention to the Fool card, saying "The Fool of course is the wisest of all. The Fool who goes down the road with the alligators barking at his heels, and the dogs yapping at him, blindfolded on his way, he knows all there is to know and does nothing about it ... nothing could touch him" (030)."

Hubbard seems to have seen himself as Parsons did as "The Joker" card, and his minions as "The Fools"

According to L Ron Hubbard Jr. his father considered himself to be the one "who came after"; that he was Crowley's successor; that he had taken on the mantle of the "Great Beast. " He told him that Scientology actually began on December the 1st, 1947. This was the day Aleister Crowley died."

Of course, the Tarot pack also contains the Empress card and knowing this it is finally possible to understand what Hubbard believed his Guardian Angel to be.

Crowley examined the Tarot in The Book of Thoth (032). Of the Empress card he said "She combines the highest spiritual with the lowest material qualities" (033). Crowley identifies the Empress as the "Great Mother", and indeed on her robe are bees (034), the traditional symbol of Cybele. Crowley is not alone in the belief that different cultures give different names to the same deities. The worship of Cybele goes back to at least 3,000 B.C. She entered Greek culture as Artemis and to the Romans was Diana, the huntress. Crowley also identified the Empress with the Hindu goddess Shakti (035), and the Egyptian goddesses Isis and Hathor. Crowley directly identified Isis with Diana (036). More usually, Crowley called the Empress by the name Babalon (037).

St Circumstance said...

Aleister Crowley's "Magick in Theory and Practice" states:

"The whole and sole object of all true magickal training is to become free from every kind of limitation....

(Bent Corydon, Messiah or Madman, p. 48).

L Ron Hubbard says, in a 1952 taped Scientology lecture:

"Our whole activity tends to make an individual completely independent of any limitation...'" (Ibid.)"




"There are interesting similarities between Crowley's writings and the teachings of Hubbard. Dianetics' Time Track, in which every incident in a person's life is chronologically recorded in full in the mind, is quite similar to Crowley's Magical Memory. The Magical Memory is developed over time until "memories of childhood reawaken" (5) which were previously forgotten, and memories of previous incarnations are recalled as well. Hubbard gives examples in the Philadelphia Doctorate Course of several people remembering lives earlier on earth, some up to a million years ago. The similarity between the Magical Memory and Time Track, then, is that they both can recall every past incident in a person's life, they both can recall incidents from past lives, and they both must be developed by certain techniques in order to make use of them."

From essay of Jeff Jacobsen,

St Circumstance said...

Now go watch the promotional video they shot using Tom Cruise. He is wearing all black and sitting in a very dimly lit room and he looks into the camera and tells Scientologists that when they pass a car wreck hey have to stop and help- because

"We are the only ones who can".... implying they will have some special powers- but there is no light at all in room, so what kind of dark power is he hinting at?


Very scary stuff....

Robert Hendrickson said...

Gee Whiz SAINT, I thought I could breeze some life back into this POST, BUT you have actually created a relevant LIFE subject here. As some have said before - maybe Manson's beliefs are NOT dependent on any ONE contact, but actually are a composite of many 'connections' made during HIS dangerous journey.

I think that the materials available to prisoners is most significant, IE Nation of Islam, Scientology, Holy Bible, etc. Rehabilitation OR Perfect Storm ?

YOU do realize SAINT this is YOUR BEST written work yet.


DebS said...

Keep on commenting, Saint, I'm learning a lot! It's much appreciated.

St Circumstance said...

None of it mine lol

St Circumstance said...

Ron Hubbard Jr. remembers that when he was ten years old, his father, in an attempt to get his son in tune with his black magic worship, laced the young Hubbard's bubble gum with Phenobarbital. According to Ron Jr. drugs were an important part of Ron Jr.'s growing up, as his father believed that they were the best way to get closer to Satan--the Antichrist of black magic.

"In my father's private circle," Ron Jr explains, "there were lots of mistresses. When I was younger, I participated in private orgies with him and three or four other women. His theory was that one has to open or crack a woman's soul in order for the satanic power to pour through it and into him. It got kind of far out, culminating in a variety of sex acts. Dad also had an incredibly violent temper. He was into S & M and would beat his mistresses and shoot them full of drugs."

When asked by a interviewer how this "soul-cracking" worked, L Ron Hubbard Jr said, "The explanation is sort of long and complicated. The basic rationale is that there are some powers in this universe that are pretty strong.

"As an example, Hitler was involved in the same black magic and the same occult practices that my father was. The identical ones. Which, as I have said, stem clear back to before Egyptian times. It's a very secret thing. Very powerful and very workable and very dangerous.

Brainwashing is nothing compared to it. The proper term would be "soul cracking."

"It's like cracking open the soul, which then opens various doors to the power that exists, the satanic and demonic powers. Simply put, it's like a tunnel or an avenue or a doorway. Pulling that power into yourself through another person--and using women, especially is incredibly insidious.

St Circumstance said...

Ron Hubbard Jr. remembers that when he was ten years old, his father, in an attempt to get his son in tune with his black magic worship, laced the young Hubbard's bubble gum with Phenobarbital. According to Ron Jr. drugs were an important part of Ron Jr.'s growing up, as his father believed that they were the best way to get closer to Satan--the Antichrist of black magic.

"In my father's private circle," Ron Jr explains, "there were lots of mistresses. When I was younger, I participated in private orgies with him and three or four other women. His theory was that one has to open or crack a woman's soul in order for the satanic power to pour through it and into him. It got kind of far out, culminating in a variety of sex acts. Dad also had an incredibly violent temper. He was into S & M and would beat his mistresses and shoot them full of drugs."

When asked by a interviewer how this "soul-cracking" worked, L Ron Hubbard Jr said, "The explanation is sort of long and complicated. The basic rationale is that there are some powers in this universe that are pretty strong.

"As an example, Hitler was involved in the same black magic and the same occult practices that my father was. The identical ones. Which, as I have said, stem clear back to before Egyptian times. It's a very secret thing. Very powerful and very workable and very dangerous.

Brainwashing is nothing compared to it. The proper term would be "soul cracking."

"It's like cracking open the soul, which then opens various doors to the power that exists, the satanic and demonic powers. Simply put, it's like a tunnel or an avenue or a doorway. Pulling that power into yourself through another person--and using women, especially is incredibly insidious.


The OTO connection

In the beginning of the 20th century, a manufacturer from Vienna Dr. Karl Kellner, and a German theosophist Dr. Franz Hertmann, founded a secret occult lodge which they named "Ordo Templi Orientis" (O.T.O.). Soon after they were joined by Theodore Reuss (1855-1923) who had connections with many lodges. It was he who led Rudolf Steiner, the founder of anthroposophy, into such a group.

Reuss, whose lodge-name was "Brother Merlin", contacted Aleister Crowley in 1912, and he became a member of this additional lodge receiving the name "Brother Baphomet". Baphomet, the symbol of the satanic goat, usually portrayed as a half-human, half-goat figure, of a goat head. It is often misinterpreted as a symbol of witchcraft in general. (It is used by Satanists, who worship the devil, but is not used by neo-Pagan witches, who do not worship the Devil.)

The origin of the name Baphomet is unclear. It may be a corruption of Mahomet (Mohammed). The English witchcraft historian Montague Summers suggested it was a combination of two Greek words, baphe and metis, meaning "absorption of knowledge." Baphomet has also been called the Goat of Mendes, the Black Goat and the Judas Goat.)

The O.T.O. developed its sexual rites quickly under Reuss and later broadened them under Crowley. Not long after, Crowley took over the leadership of the lodge. Like other secret lodges, members may not disclose their knowledge.

St Circumstance said...

Aleister Crowley's ideology and Scientology's ideology: a comparison

There are many similarities between Crowley's writings and the teachings of Hubbard. To name but a few of the most benign: there is the Dianetics' Time Track, in which every incident in a person's life is chronologically recorded in full, in the mind. This is quite similar to Crowley's Magical Memory. The Magical Memory is developed over time until "memories of childhood reawaken" which were previously forgotten, and memories of previous incarnations are recalled as well.

Hubbard gives examples in the Philadelphia Doctorate Course of several people remembering lives earlier on earth, some up to a million years ago. The similarity between the Magical Memory and Time Track is that they both can recall every past incident in a person's life, they both can recall incidents from past lives, and they both must be developed by certain techniques in order to make use of them.

Both Hubbard and Crowley consider it important to have the person recall his or her birth. "Having allowed the mind to return for some hundred times to the hour of birth, it should be encouraged to endeavor to penetrate beyond that period" {Crowley). "After twenty runs through birth, the patient experienced a recession of all somatics and 'unconsciousness' and aberrative content." "Thus there was no inhibition about looking earlier than birth for what Dianetics had begun to call basic-basic" (Hubbard).

In 1952, Hubbard recommended a work by black magician Aleister Crowley, which Hubbard called The Master Therion (published in 1929). This book was reprinted as Magick in Theory and Practice, and it also contains reference to the recollection of birth: "Having allowed the mind to return for some hundred times to the hour of birth, it should be encouraged to endeavor to penetrate beyond that period. If it be properly trained to run backwards, there will be little difficulty in doing this."

Both Hubbard and Crowley are avowedly anti-psychiatry. "Official psychoanalysis is therefore committed to upholding a fraud... psychoanalysts have misinterpreted life, and announced the absurdity that every human being is essentially an antisocial, criminal, and insane animal" (Crowley). Hubbard considered that psychiatry controlled most of society and was struggling to create a 1984 world.

St Circumstance said...

Both Hubbard and Crowley are avowedly anti-psychiatry. "Official psychoanalysis is therefore committed to upholding a fraud... psychoanalysts have misinterpreted life, and announced the absurdity that every human being is essentially an antisocial, criminal, and insane animal" (Crowley). Hubbard considered that psychiatry controlled most of society and was struggling to create a 1984 world.

Hubbard and Crowley both posit the ability of the person to leave his or her body at times. Crowley states that the way to learn to leave your body is to mock up a body like your own in front of your physical body. Eventually you will learn to leave your physical body with your "astral body" and travel and view at will without physical restrictions. Hubbard teaches the same, and his method of "exteriorization" is to tell the person to "have preclear mock up own body" which will send the person outside his body.

Both Crowley and Hubbard use an equilateral triangle pointing up in a circle as one of their group's symbols. Both use Volume 0 instead of Volume 1 to begin enumerating their works.

Crowley's notion of "the will": "The original definition of Scientology 8-8008 was the attainment of infinity by the reduction of the apparent infinity and power of the MEST [Matter, Energy, Space, Time] universe to a zero for himself, and the increase of the apparent zero of one's own universe to an infinity for oneself ... It can be seen that [the] infinity [symbol] stood upright makes the number eight" . Which is to say, the essential idea of Scientology is to raise the power of the individual's will or intention to "an infinity". This aim is held in common with all magical systems (Cavendish quotes Crowley "the Great Work is the raising of the whole man in perfect balance to the power of Infinity", The Magical Arts, p.5). The exercises used in the attempt to achieve this - especially those in The Creation of Human Ability (some of which were on the original "OT 5" course) - are ritual magic disguised as therapy.

St Circumstance said...

Adopting the same stated purpose for Scientology as Crowley had for his Magic, Hubbard says, in a 1952 taped Scientology lecture: "Our whole activity tends to make an individual completely independent of any limitation."

In Crowley's Organization are several grade levels. To reach the Grade of Adeptus Exemptus "The Adept must prepare and publish a thesis setting forth His knowledge of the Universe, and his proposals for its welfare and progress. He will thus be known as the leader of a school of thought." It is apparent that Hubbard has fulfilled this requirement.

The "creative processing" of Hubbard's 1952 Philadelphia Doctorate Course derives substantially from the work of black magician Aleister Crowley. One could go on for quite some time listing the similarities between Crowley's and Hubbard's theories and writings, but for additional information the reader is encouraged to investigate for him or herself.

St Circumstance said...

Scientology's symbols and the Satanic

The "S and double triangle" motif of Scientology's main symbol probably derives from the black magic use of the snake symbol (the "wise serpent" or Satan) combined with a deconstruction into two triangles of the Star of David (rather like the reverse ritual of hanging the Christian cross upside down to signify devil worship). This symbol - the magical hexagram - was used by Hubbard and Parsons during their attempts at incarnating the Antichrist in human form.

The RTC (a main Scientology corporation) symbol contains the Dianetics triangle, which is a common magical symbol, representing the door of the Cabala, the letter Daleth. Hubbard indeed assigned it to the Greek equivalent of Daleth, Delta. The triangle on its base is also the symbol of Set, the Egyptian god called by some "the destroyer of man", the male equivalent of Babalon. Indeed Crowley equates Set with Satan. Hubbard also used the "Daleth" triangle of the Egyptian destroyer-god Set as the Dianetic symbol.

Hubbard copied the back of Crowley's Tarot-cards, a distinctively marked cross, which he used for his main Scientology church cross and symbol.

The Sea Organization symbol of Scientology's elite paramilitary division is also interesting. The five pointed star, or pentacle is the most commonly known symbol of magical power. It is held between two thirteen-leaved laurels.

The theta symbol used by Scientology is the central symbol of Crowley's Ordo Templi Orientis, where it denotes "Thelma" or the will. Perhaps Hubbard's "thetan" is pronounced to match with a lisped "Satan"? He was, after all, wry in his humor and such a subtle perverse twist and deceit of lower initiates would be entirely congruent with classical Satanism.

Crowley's order - the OTO - had a common origin with the Thule group to which several members of the Nazi hierarchy belonged (including deputy party chairman Rudolph Hess). The sig rune used by the Nazis - appears on the Scientology International Management Organization's symbol - a red square enclosing a white disc and set off by four lightning flashes or sig runes. The swastika of the Nazi flag has been replaced by the Scientology "S and double triangle". The symbol of the Religious Technology Center is surrounded by sig runes. The sig rune is otherwise peculiar to the Nazis.

L. Ron, junior, was sure that the teachings of the pre-Nazi Germanen Orden and the Thule secret societies had passed directly to his father by courier. No explanation is given for using these sig runes by Scientology. At the time that both of these symbols were introduced, Hubbard also created the International Finance Police, headed by the International Finance Dictator. An significant choice of words

St Circumstance said...

Hubbard's words and Crowley's religious ideology

One can tell a lot about what type of religion an organization is by looking at the spiritual qualities of the religion's founders, their words, and the organization's key leaders. Wherever possible this story will quote from the policy and spiritual directives of Scientology's founder L. Ron Hubbard...

While Hubbard was supposedly researching his Dianetics in the late 1940s, he was in fact engaging in magical rituals, and trying out hypnosis both on himself and others. During the 1984 Armstrong trial against Scientology, extracts from Hubbard's voluminous self-hypnotic affirmations were read into the record. The statements, hundreds of pages of them, are written in red ink and Hubbard frequently drew pictures of the male genitalia alongside the text.

Amongst his affirmations to himself we find" "Men are my slaves", "Elemental Spirits are my slaves" and "You can be merciless whenever your will is crossed and you have every right to be merciless" "All women shall succumb to my charms! All mankind shall grovel at my feet and not know why."

L. Ron Hubbard repeatedly played them back to himself while under the influence of hallucinatory drugs such as mescaline and cocaine. Was Hubbard's evil intention to secretly subjugate no less than all of mankind?

In 1938 in a letter to the first of Hubbard's three wives he said, "I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take legendary form..."

St Circumstance said...

More from the sacred scriptures of Hubbard. "THE ONLY WAY YOU CAN CONTROL PEOPLE IS TO LIE TO THEM. You can write that down in your book in great big letters. The only way you can control anybody is to lie to them."

"If you really want to enslave people tell them that you are going to give them total freedom." (At the top of the Scientology grade chart of levels of initiate attainment at the OT 8 level is the benefit obtained from that level. At OT 8 it is written "Total Freedom.")

Of practitioners unlicensed by him Hubbard said "Harass these persons in any possible way." Nor did Hubbard exclude the possibility of murder against those who opposed him. The "Suppressive Person declare" and the "Fair Game Law" speak reams in terms of Hubbard's true intent and spiritual nature.

"An enemy may be deprived of property or injured by any means by any Scientologist without any discipline of the Scientologist...may be tricked, sued, lied to, or destroyed." From the words of L. Ron Hubbard in HCO policy letter of 18 October 1967, known as the "Fair Game Policy."

"A suppressive person becomes fair game. By fair game is meant may not be further protected by the codes and disciplines of Scientology...They cannot be granted the rights and beingness ordinarily accorded rational beings and so place themselves beyond any consideration for their feelings or well being...The homes, property, places, abodes of persons who have been active in attempting to suppress Scientology are all beyond the protection of Scientology ethics."

St Circumstance said...

More from the mouth of L Ron Hubbard: "When you move off a point of power, pay all your obligations on the nail, empower your friends completely and move off with your pockets full of artillery, potential blackmail on every erstwhile rival, unlimited funds in your private account and the addresses of experienced assassins and go live in Bulgaria and bribe the police ....

"So to live at all in the shadow or employ of a power you must yourself gather and USE enough power to hold your own-without just nattering to the power to kill Pete', in straightforward or more suppressive veiled ways to him as these wreck the power that supports yours. He doesn't have to know all the bad news and if he's a power really he won't ask all the time, What are all those dead bodies doing at the door?' And if you are clever, you never let it be thought HE killed them-that weakens you and also hurts the power source. Well, boss, about all those dead bodies, nobody at all will suppose you did it. She over there, those pink legs sticking out, didn't like me.'

" Well,' he'll say if he really is a poor, why are you bothering me with it if its done and you did it. Where's my blue ink?' Or, Skipper three shore patrolmen will be along soon with your cook, Dober, and they'll want to tell you he beat up Simson.' Who's Simson?' He's a clerk in the office enemy downtown.'

" Good, when they've done it, take Dober down to the dispensary for any treatment he needs. Oh yes. Raise his pay.'....

"...we all aren't on the stage with our names in lights, always push power in the direction of anyone on whose power you depend. It may be more money for the power, or more ease, or a snarling defense of the power to a critic, or even the dull thud of one of his enemies in the dark, or the glorious blaze of the whole enemy camp as a birthday surprise .... Real powers are developed by tight conspiracies of this kind pushing someone up in whose leadership they have faith." (From the policy directive "The Responsibilities of Leaders" by L. Ron Hubbard.)

Hubbard on compassion and ethics, "This universe is a rough universe. Its a deadly serious universe. Only the strong survive. Only the ruthless can own it." (From The History of Man by L Ron Hubbard, p.38.) "Only a barbarian minister is a man of God." "The purpose of ethics is to remove counter-intentions from the environment." (HCO policy letter of June 18, 1968.)

In Booklet of the Scientology Professional Auditors Course (1982), states. "A very effective thought control technique could be worked out from Scientology which could be used to make individuals into WILLING slaves." (emphasis added)

St Circumstance said...

Two sinister Scientology graduates of the 60s were Robert DeGrimston and his wife Mary Ann. He was a former architecture student and she was a former prostitute who believed herself to be Joseph Goebbels incarnate. Both had an insatiable preoccupation with death and violence and it is perhaps inevitable that they ended up in San Francisco in 1967 where they established themselves as The Process Church of the Final Judgement. They took up residence on Oak St., in the so-called Devil House, two blocks from where Charles Manson had his ‘family’ and close by Anton Lavey’s Church of Satan. Processans wandered the Haight sporting black capes and black suits and preaching a gospel of doom and destruction. The first edition of Ed Sanders’ book The Family carries an interesting chapter on the Process Church. But a Chicago lawyer convinced them to sue for defamation and the offending chapter was deleted from subsequent editions. Robert Degrimston published several books on war (his favorite theme) and commanded his followers “THOU SHALT KILL!” Another Process publication urged readers to experience the pleasures of grave robbing and necrophilia. A rant in the ‘Death’ issue of their magazine was penned by Charles Manson. Manson’s rap was an amalgam of Process ideology and the 150 hours of Scientology auditing he’d received during one of his numerous prison stints (Charlie declared himself a ‘Theta Clear’).

Contrary to popular belief, the Process is still around, having undergone numerous name changes over the years. The first was the ‘Four-P Movement.’ Author Michael Newton wrote that the cult, “is also deeply involved in white slavery, child pornography and the international narcotics trade.” Still other name changes for the Process included The Foundation Church of the Millenium, The Foundation Faith of God and then Best Friends Animal Sanctuary. Today it is known as The Best Friends Animal Society and is located in Kanab, Utah. Mary Ann Degrimston makes her home there along with several other former members. Gone are the days when Process members journeyed to San Quentin to interview Manson. Gone too are all references to Satan and doomsday. Members now softpeddle their involvement in the Process Church of the Final Judgement citing juvenile misguidance. The goal of the reformed church now is to save animals. The large compound in southern Utah is their testament to this end. And the animal sanctuary is a huge cash cow. In 2003 the Society raised more than $20 million. Perhaps the Degrimstons were wise to abandon Scientology when they did. Robert currently works in New York City as a business consultant.



Maryann has passed away since this was written.....

Cielodrive.com said...

Some additional documents on Ramer

snowdensofyesteryear said...

What's really ironic is that, with all of the inherent racism in Hubbard's teachings, Louis Farrakhan has for at least the last decade, been recomending a version of Dianetics auditing to members of the Nation of Islam. As far as the Crowley connection goes, Hubbard was by no means a legitimate successor to Crowley's teachings, as he was not given the proper initiation and instruction that would be necessary to use Crowley's techniques in a constructive manner, which actually accounts for the cancerous insanity that continues to this day inside his Church. At least, that's what I've heard from occultists who are supposedly "in the know".

St Circumstance said...

Wow.. that was interesting I just read this stuff lol - can you elaborate on what you know from actual occultists?

I never met one in my life

The boy wonder said...

I knew scientologists were mental beyond belief but didn't know it was derived from Alastair Crowleys special take on deranged! Most hexllent work people, how in the name of any God do they get away with the whole religion thing tax wise etc? Seen a few documentaries and non of them made me feel like joining up,truly vile.

The boy wonder said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
snowdensofyesteryear said...

I've only met a couple people I would consider occultists, and honestly they didn't seem like people I wanted to get too involved with. But since I will discuss conspiracy theories with anyone, I did get a few tidbits. That plus LRH jr.'s notorious Penthouse interview and a few of the sources already quoted in this discussion give, I think, a pretty clear example of what Hubbard thought he was doing, regardless of how seriously one takes all the Magick stuff, he obviously was highly influenced and motivated by his understanding of it. Oh, and since this is a Manson board, I can't resist: What if the Nation of Islam's acceptance of Dianetics "technology" is part of some grand Scientology Helter Skelter plan? We could drag in the Zebra killings and who knows what else to connect the sinister dots and concoct quite a theory.

St Circumstance said...

Thank you for answering.... :)

Robert Hendrickson said...

SAINT: Awhile back I sent Matt a photo of several old occult magazines from the 1930-40s with the caption: Did Manson read these while in prison ? for a possible POST. "The Theosophist" and "The Occultist" are a few of the magazines I have.

AND about a year ago I put a few up for sale on eBay with a DVD of MANSON. Someone from the UK bought the group. Then I thought I better read some of the articles more carefully and wala, I discovered that some of Manson's dialogue / beliefs came straight from these magazines and decided not sell any more.

Actually, I also found out these magazines, though they exist in re-printed form I have all originals and they are somewhat valuable.

Interesting story is I tried to get rid of this mentally dangerous collection about 25 years ago, but when I opened the large box (which I bought at a garage sale for $5) I just happened to flip some pages of the book on top and BINGO there was a brand new $20 bill from the 1930s book stuck between the pages.

So I knew I had to at least keep the collection until I checked between ALL the pages, which could takes months.


St Circumstance said...

Like I said back when I did the conspiracy and coincidence post. Charlie walked out of jail and into some strange times. He seems to have had some exposure to Scientology, the Process, satanism and a lot of other really far out stuff which he seemed to blend together into his own unique rap.

As he was older and more street wise than the rest of them I'm sure he wasable to make it sound very impressive

St Circumstance said...

the 2 sites I spent years reading about Scientology are "Operation clambake" and "Lermanet.com" here is what Arnie Lermers page says about the Manson Scientology connection:


Arnie Lerma writes:

Charles Manson, having grown up in reform schools and penitentiaries, was trained by professional criminal minds, I bet his insight made it instantly apparant to Charles Manson, that Scientology was a useful tool to control minds. He valued it so much he even acquired a scientology E-meter so he could practice scientology.

What cannot be debated is that there was something in Scientology that a serial killer criminal mind found very appealing, useful.. it was a TOOL that empowered him, that provided the means, making him capable of not just being a lone monster like The Son of Sam, Jeffery Dahlmer, but one who was able to mould a group that would follow his every instruction and go out and do exactly what he had told them to do. And they did!

A reader comments on the above:

I find this aspect very interesting. It became apparent to me early on that the early Hubbardian "training routines" and other indoctrination practices are geared toward a few very specific, interrelated ends.

The early "training" in staring and being stared at for hours, screaming and being screamed at, imposing one's will, dominating conversations with trickery, etc. - they all have very specific uses.

One of those uses is what makes this early "bait-and-minion-training" part of the Hubbard Con so attractive to actors. Actors, just like con men, have to learn to "lie" with extreme effectiveness to do their jobs, short circuiting their natural behavior and actions - they have to lose stage fright, self-doubt and be CONfident no matter what they are saying or doing at a given time. They have to be able to demand and seize attention in order to be successful.

But I digress.

I'm working on a critical analysis of the Hubbard TRs, and the idea that other wannabe cult leaders would see Hubbard's techniques for what they are does not surprise me. It's long been in evidence that Manson at least dabbled in Hubbard techniques. Manson is evil and crazy, but still extremely crafty and even intelligent - just like Hubbard. It's hard to con a con man, and I am sure Manson saw quite clearly how he could put Hubbardian brainwashing and cult training to good use.

Right from the start, if you can get people to believe in two things that Hubbard taught as fundamental, you are well on your way to success as a cult leader:

1) Truth is a fiction; "truth" is relative.
2) The group (led by me and only me) is more important than you.

After that you can get people to do pretty much anything - like be willing participants in an organized crime cult. That's what Hubbard and Manson both did, to different degrees of "success."

St Circumstance said...

The opening paragraph of the 'forward' written by PAUL KRASSNER, Editor of the REALIST, of book III of Peter Lavenda's "Sinister Forces" series, A Grimoire of American Political Witchcraft" "The Manson Secret".

"There are other Sams out there--God help the world." -David Berkowitz "
The Son of Sam serial killer

Paul Krassner:

In 1971, I began to write an article, "The Rise of Sirhan Sirhan in the Scientology Hierarchy" for my satirical magazine, The Realist. Then, in the course of my research, a strange thing happened. I learned of the actual involvement of Charles Manson with Scientology. In fact, there had been an E-Meter at the Spahn Ranch where his "family" stayed. Suddenly, I no longer had any reason to use Sirhan Sirhan as my protagonist. Reality will transcend allegory every time. So, although I had announced that I was going to publish that article, I started investigating the Manson case instead. Nevertheless, Scientology sued me for $750,000 for just those nine words- whoops, there goes the whole petty cash account-but I chose to fight them on l st Amendment grounds, and they eventually dropped the suit.

Book III of Peter Lavenda's "Sinister Forces" - Peter Lavenda:

"When manson was released in 1967, he went to the Scientology Center in San Francisco. Family member "Little Paul" Watkins, who accompanied him there told me, "Charlie said to them, "I'm Clear"-what do I do now?"

"In Los Angeles, he went to the Scientology Celebrity Center. Now this was more like it. Here he could mingle with the elite. i managed to obtain a copy of the original log entry: "7/31/68, new name, Charlie Manson, Devt., No Address In for Processing = Ethics = Type III." The receptionist-who by Type III, meant "psychotic"-sent him to the Ethics Office, but he never showed up."

"At the Spahn Ranch, Manson eclectically combined his version of Scientology auditing with post-hypnotic techniques he had learned in prison, with geographical isolation and subliminal motivation....."

St Circumstance said...

Excerpt from Sinister Forces by Peter Lavenda Book III The Manson Secret

Page 196 - Return of the Process

A key element in Terry's thesis is that the Process Church of the Final Judgement is alive and well, and involved in nefarious activity stretching from drug-running to child prostitution to murder. This was also asserted in Ed Sanders' study of the Manson Family, The Family. Sanders was succesfully sued (in the United States) and references to both the Process and the OTO -- on The Ultimate Evil, so prevalent in the first edition of his book - were expunged by the time the book was republished. (This was not so in the United Kingdom, where the courts decided in favor of the publisher and author.)

However, Terry recounts in The Ultimate Evil his discussions with Sanders concerning these cults. Terry makes no bones about mentioning both the Process and is the OTO in The Ultimate Evil, and has evidently resisted any legal at attempts to get him to change his story.

What initially bothered Terry about the Process was the appearance in one of their issues (the "Death" issue) of an article written by Charles Manson. Critics of the Terry thesis have scoffed at this, saying that such persons as Marianne Faithfull and Salvador Dali also appeared in the Process magazine, my reaction is simply this, however:

what was Charles Manson doing in such in such august company? Further, Marianne Faithfull (as we have seen) had a long association with occultists of the Crowley dispensation through her relationship with Kenneth Anger. Dali himself was very involved in occultism, was well-known in several occult milieus, and his paintings-true to his reputation as a surrealist-reveal many occult and alchemical themes. There is a certain cultural or spiritual consistency to those who graced the pages of the Process magazine, and to dismiss Manson's appearance there as of little import is to be quite naive.. Further, as we have already learned, Manson told prosecutors Bugliosi that he and Robert Moore (the founder of the Process) were "the same." In addition, members of the Process on a mysterious mission visited Manson in prison after his arrest for the Tate/La Blanca killings, after which he no longer referred to The Process in any way. It is doubtful that Manson would have been worried about a lawsuit for slander, so we have to assume that something more was at stake.

In addition, we also have the visits by Manson Family member Bruce Davis to England on at least two occasions; as discussed in Book I, the British police agencies identified Davis as visiting the Scientologists and/or the Process on each visit. In fact, we also have the murders of former Scientologists in England at this time, members connected with the Manson Family and, as we will see, yet another Scientologist was killed, this time in connection with the Son of Sam case. That there was a connection -- however tenuous one believes it to be -- between Manson and the Process is known and documented, even in the Process' own publication. The neo-gnostic theology of the Process would have appealed to Manson, extolling as it does both Jesus and Satan-Manson thought he was both, anyway.

The next step is to find any relation at all between David Berkowitz, the Son of Sam murders, and the Process. If this can be done, then we have left the realm of pure speculation and have entered the world of logical possibility.

Robert Hendrickson said...

SAINT: There are NO new ideas. EVERYTHING is just re-circulated. Do you know how many Jesus Christs were reported to have been identified BEFORE the one who is best known TODAY ?

Of course Charlie Manson had to have gotten HIS lingo from some other folks who walked HIS path BEFORE him. That's exactly how it works. The VIKINGS were here in America BEFORE Columbus, but the Native 'Americans' were here even BEFORE the Vikings.

It's NOT the idea, it's the PRESENTATION that counts (causes the effect). A perfect example is Bernie Sanders - HE is the final step BEFORE Communist RULE and I suspect Donald Trump is the final out-cry "Hell no we WON"T go - all the way to communism."

I remember browsing though an old LA 'music-sheet' store in the early 1960's and there it was: a famous Fat's Domino 'song' on paper, BUT it didn't mention Fat's, CAUSE it was printed in the 1930's - NOT in the 50's when HE made it famous AGAIN.

AND that little incident WOKE me up FOREVER more.

St Circumstance said...

but the Ultimate Evil is the ultimate BS lol trust me- I read the whole thing and its nonsense...

St Circumstance said...

From HELTER SKELTER by Vincent T. Bugliosi, Paul Watkins when Bugliosi interviewed him about Manson's philosophy:

Manson had told him that while he was in prison he had studied Scientology, becoming a "theta" which Manson defined as being "clear". (p. 237)

An Ex-intelligence officer for Scientology, Robert Vaughn Young said:

"I...was at staff at the Davis franchise from 1969 until '71. ...Well, because of the work that I was doing in Davis, I started to do some public relations work as well as some other staff positions there, meeting the media. I was also running a program in Vacaville Prison, which is a medical facility that's just west of Sacramento -- happens to be the one where Charlie Manson was kept for a long time -- that I would go in every -- you know, every week and hold a class in Scientology."

A few selections from Snapping, by Flo Conway and Jim Siegleman This is also a MUST BE READ book for anyone involved in trying to do something about the Scientology problem and for mind control cults in general.

The Manson Murders.

Although it is public knowledge that Charles Manson was deeply interested in Scientology before he formed his Family, even though he never joined the sect, the possible resemblance between some Scientological practices and Manson's methods of controlling his band has not been fully explored. We do not believe or intend to imply that there was any formal or informal connection between the Church of Scientology and the now legendary murders of actress Sharon Tate and her houseguests and another couple, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca. We are, however, suggesting a similarity between some techniques used and taught by Scientology and the manner in which Charles Manson manipulated the members of his Family.

Vincent Bugliosi, prosecuting attorney in the Manson trial, made frequent mention of Scientology and one-time Scientologists with ref- erence to Manson's life and career in his best-selling account of the case, Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders, published in 1974. Bugliosi served up all the details of Manson's drifting, troubled youth-an illegitimate child, he bounced from town to town, engaging in a haphazard string of petty crimes and larcenous acts. Seventeen ofManson's first thirty-two years were spent in jails and prisons, yet, Bugliosi noted, Manson's criminal record to that time showed no sustained history of violence.

"Burglar, car thief, forger, pimp," he wrote, "was this the portrait of a mass murderer?"

St Circumstance said...

It was in prison, apparently, that Manson became interested in Scientology. According to Helter Skelter, in the early sixties, Manson's tutor in Scientology was another convict, Lanier Rayner, and under his direction Manson claimed to have achieved Scientology's highest level, which he described as "Theta clear:" Bugliosi wrote that Manson, whose career goal was to gain recognition as a rock musician, remained interested in Scientology longer than in any other subject except music. A prison progress report written during that period asserted that Manson "appears to have developed a certain amount of insight into his problems through his study of this discipline."

There is no way to determine whether Charles Manson actually experienced becoming a Scientology clear. It is known that not long afterward, upon his release from prison in 1967, Manson began to formulate his grand delusionary and messianic schemes. It was also during this period that he began to demonstrate an uncanny ability to exert influence and control over other people.

Through the spring and summer of 1967, when Manson was recruiting members from the hippies, drifters and runaway flower children of the Haight, his fledgling Family had frequent interaction with an ominous tribe that lived just two blocks away. This was the archetypal sixties era religious cult called the Process, or the Church of the Final Judgment, a group whose members walked the streets in long black robes, preaching the imminent arrival of a violent Armageddon as presaged in the Book of Revelation. According to Bugliosi, the Process was founded by a former disciple of L. Ron Hubbard himself who broke with Scientology to form his own group after attaining an important position in Scientology's London headquarters Bugliosi cited numerous elements in Manson's worldview he believed were borrowed from the Process: distorted attitudes toward life and death, the worshipping of fear and violence, and a variety of satanic delusions and black revolutionary schemes."

Mansons activities as a pimp and forger and his years in prison certainly schooled him in his basic skills of an expert con man. But it may have been his expereinces with Rayner that provided him with some of his communication tools he used to manipulate the minds of his young followers. "Undoubtedly," wrote Bugliosi, "he picked up from his 'auditing' sessions in prison some knowledge of mind control, as well as some technques which he later put to use programming his followers.

St Circumstance said...

I think you are right about that MR.H....

snowdensofyesteryear said...

As a side note, much in the way Manson copped some scientology lingo, I've noticed in what little I've read about Paul Crockett, he seems to have done much the same with terminology from G.I. Gurdjieff's Fourth Way teachings, notably the concept of "three centers". I've been meaning to look deeper into that connection for awhile now.

orwhut said...

Robert Hendrickson said...

It's NOT the idea, it's the PRESENTATION that counts (causes the effect). A perfect example is Bernie Sanders - HE is the final step BEFORE Communist RULE and I suspect Donald Trump is the final out-cry "Hell no we WON"T go - all the way to communism."

ROBERT! There is wisdom in the above statement but, it sounds so much like LBJ's thinking I can't believe you said it.

Robert Hendrickson said...

ORWHUT: How am I ever going to get something past YOU ? Imagine MY confusion - a ten year WAR against the Communists and NOW we want to be just like THEM.

The BEST I understand it: America is NOT a real or PURE Democracy, because we do NOT get to vote on major issues, like "Whether to go to WAR in Vietnam or Iraq or ANYWHERE else. We ONLY get to decide WHICH loser will decide EVERYTHING for us.

The ENGLISH people 'personally' just voted themselves out of the European Union - THEY made that decision - NOT some Dingo from Gingo. AND now Americans ONLY get to decide IN-directly whether: 'Women get government sponsored FREE abortions and ISIS gets to run us over OR whether Mexicans have to complete a WALL and ISIS is a goner.

The ONLY thing I know for sure is: The BACK man in the White House is ready to hand the reigns of POWER over to a White woman. Apparently, HE has had enough !

grimtraveller said...

I thought he had no choice.

grimtraveller said...

St Circumstance said...

It was in prison, apparently, that Manson became interested in Scientology. According to Helter Skelter, in the early sixties, Manson's tutor in Scientology was another convict, Lanier Rayner, and under his direction Manson claimed to have achieved Scientology's highest level, which he described as "Theta clear:" Bugliosi wrote that Manson, whose career goal was to gain recognition as a rock musician, remained interested in Scientology longer than in any other subject except music. A prison progress report written during that period asserted that Manson "appears to have developed a certain amount of insight into his problems through his study of this discipline."

In George's book, Charlie is of the opinion that Scientology and it's darker offshoots like the process never really touched him and that he wasn't impressed by them. He admits to being exposed to them but little beyond that.

Robert Hendrickson said...

Do you know how many Jesus Christs were reported to have been identified BEFORE the one who is best known TODAY ?

How many were there ?

St Circumstance said...

Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard’s views are shockingly racist to modern sensibilities, but were common in white society during much of his life.....Hence, Scientology is inherently racist

Although I first heard of Scientology when I first read "Helter Skelter," I never really took in what Bugliosi & Gentry had to say. There was so much to take in and that was never going to be on my list of priorities, being atheist at the time. Outside of that though, the first time I noticed any reference to the whole shebang was on Stanley Clarke's 2nd solo album, the one with the iconic shot of him in the scarf {scroll down to find it}, on the back sleeve where he gives thanks to the various people and then also to L Ron, whom he calls the greatest man on the planet. Now that's ironic !

St Circumstance said...

George is a very good guy who I thoroughly enjoyed spending time with, and liked very much...

And although he is hardly neutral when it comes to Charlie lol

I think I agree with him. I am just re-pasting what others wrote in these comments. My own feeling is that Charlie came across the Process at some point, but never really had much to do with them. I also feel like he may have played around with Scientology to pass some tie in the clink, but I dont think any of that stuff had a profound impact on him. I believe he just picked up one or two ideas, or phrases, which fit into other motivations he had at one time or another.

I do the same thing. I still quote movies from when I was a kid as part of my own lexicon of phrases. When I give speeches at work, or in front of teams I coach, I repeat quotes or expressions That I heard other people use over the years that impressed me.

The difference is the kind of people and influences that one is exposed to. I grew up in a college town in a family of cops. Charlie quite the opposite.

I wonder sometimes if he didnt get the better end of that deal lol

Bobby said...

We were not founded as democracy but as a Republic. Unfortunate that we have seemingly become one which always in the past has not ended well.

Shorty's pistols said...

Manson studied Scientology hard and for an extended time. His later statements that he didn't find much there are belied by his use and application of ST tech and concepts.

He began his study of ST with Ramer and got pretty extensively involved. Ramer was described as a capable Level I auditor. Charlie learned the ST training routines and Ramer was able to gauge their effect on Charlie by giving him 150 hours of auditing.

Charlie took the Comm course and the study course. He was heavily into it and had a strong emotional reaction to all the input. It caused Charlie to freak out. ST's refer to this as being "overrun. Charlie also took the CCH's and the Help course (who have you helped, who have you not helped). Some of this training stuck with Charlie and he would demonstrate his knowledge of these things when he worked with various members of the family.

The CCH-3 TR involves placing your hands in the air across from another student You then try to mirror your hand movements with the other and mentally influence those movements until you get in synch. It's called Hand Space Mimicry. Leslie told of the times Charlie and her would do this TR.

There are other examples of this. In his statement to the court with the jury gone, Charlie makes reference to "postulation", 'mock-up', both ST terms referring to asserting your will over a natural situation and have it come out your way.

Clem, in his trial, tries to explain to a DA what and engram is. Not too successfully, I might add.

Did Charlie make clear?

I doubt it.

The term is Operating Theta - Level I, BTW, not "Beta Clear" or whatever is said in HS.

I doubt they had an e-meter in the prison sessions in which he participated. That instrument must be used by an approved auditor to get you up the bridge to that lofty spiritual tier.