Monday, July 16, 2012

Hans Habe (Marina's father)

Hans Habe was born of János Békessy on 12 February 1911 in Budapest.

He was the son of  tabloid newspaper publisher Imre Békessy (I have read that he had a reputation of being quite shady).

Hans lived in Vienna until 1926, when Karl Kraus initiated an extortion scandal against his father.

The son studied German language and literature at Heidelberg and found his first position as a reporter for newspapers in Vienna.

He edited army newspapers and sympathized temporarily with the Austrian fascists.

His early career was quite successful, and he was the first to discover Adolf Hitler's origins and real name, Schicklgruber.

Beginning in 1934, Habe was the League of Nations correspondent for the Neue Wiener Journal and the Prager Tageblatt. In 1936 he published Drei über die Grenze (Three over the Frontier ), described as an "exile novel of a nonexile."

Expatriated from Austria, Habe served as a volunteer in the French army in 1939-40, became a German POW, and in 1940 escaped to the United States.

His successful war novel A Thousand Shall Fall (Ob Tausend fallen ) was published in the United States in 1941.

After being trained as a defense officer in the U.S. Army, Habe was promoted to major and was assigned to serve as a member of the American committee to establish a democratic press in defeated Germany. His most important achievement was the founding of the Munich newspaper Die Neue Zeitung.

In his not entirely reliable report Im Jahre Null: Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der deutschen Presse (1966), on the history of the German press, he characterized the attitude of the American occupying forces as "anti-German" and "pro-Russian" and claimed to have repeatedly warned the United States of the communist danger.

Habe published successfully as a novelist in the United States, with his works reflecting his personal experiences. The novel Aftermath (1948) portrays the end of the war and postwar period and criticizes the emancipated American woman.

Off Limits (1954) relates stories surrounding the American occupation of Germany. Black Earth (1952) depicts the fight of farmers in Hungary against the Soviet influence on domestic agricultural policies.

In 1946 Habe moved to Hollywood and then, in 1951, to Ascona, Switzerland.

His attempt to publish the magazines Neue Münchner Illustrierte and Echo der Woche in Munich failed, and Habe's journalistic career ended in 1954.

With more than 40 publications to his credit, however, Habe established a reputation as a best-selling novelist.

From the 1960s on, calling himself an "extremist of the center," he openly opposed left-wing and liberal authors such as Max Frisch and Rolf Hochhuth in Welt am Sonntag.

In the same vein he argued against the antireader and antimoral avant-garde, the nouveau roman, and the so-called nonrepresentational novel.

Throughout his career he remained a pugnacious defender of his own interests and opinions. He sued the magazine Stern in 1952 for the publication of details of his private life, and he brought politically motivated suits against others, for example, in the charges made against Friedrich Dürrenmatt in 1972.

Habe died on 29 September 1977 in Locarno, Switzerland. You're only one in a million, so why bother to speak up, to get involved, to commit yourself? German author Hans Habe answers this way: "The world is one percent good, one percent bad, and 98 percent neutral, and this is why what individuals do is important".





5 comments:

sunset77 said...

Here are the facts as I understand them.

Apparently, Marina's parents had been divorced for 10 years when Marina was murdered. Hans Habe reportedly flew back from Europe, Hans Habe had 6 wives in total.

On December 29th, 1968, Marina spent the day with friends and arrived home about 3am. Her mother awoke to some sounds outside, and looking out, she saw Marina in the driveway, standing beside her car with a man. The two were arguing, it seemed. The man ordered Marina into the car, and they drove off. On January 1st, 1969, a passerby spotted a purse lying on the shoulder of the road on Mullholland Drive, near the intersection to Bowmont.

Apparently, Marina's body was found abut 7 miles from her house. "There was no evidence of forcible rape" said the autopsy surgeon Dr. Russell C. Henry.

"Habe allegedly knew Bruce Davis, and had visited the Family ranch in Chatsworth on several occasions with her friend DeeDee, daughter of actress Angela Lansbury and Manson Family follower."

My own personal observation is that if you arrive home from a date at 3:30 a.m. and there is a black sedan that either followed you home or is sitting there waiting, it didn't get there by accident.

While the connections to the Manson family are circumstantial, they are strong nevertheless. Also, less that 1 year later, in Nov. 1969, the body of Jane Doe #59 was found murdered in the same "overkill" fasion as Habe within sight of where Habe's body had been found.

starship said...

Sunset...you quote, so please tell us from where the quotes come from.

Thanks.

sunset77 said...

starship said...

Sunset...you quote, so please tell us from where the quotes come from.

I have a busting headache right now so I don't really feel like looking it all up again right now.

The stuff about Hans Habe is on Wikipedia.

I found 2 old newspaper clips about Marina Habe online, I think it was the "Sarasota Journal". Here is a link to one of them Girl Stabbed.

Some Marina Habe info came from here.

Habe's autopsy report can be read here.

starship said...

"Habe allegedly knew Bruce Davis, and had visited the Family ranch in Chatsworth on several occasions with her friend DeeDee, daughter of actress Angela Lansbury and Manson Family follower."

Ok, whatever...that comes from missingme2007 or some such deal. Highly unlikely because if true then they LA DA would certainly have prosecuted.

Helsinki Lives said...

I know this is a very far out theory but what if it was someone with Nazi ties as well. If her father was one of the first ones to discover Hitler's real name, someone might not have liked that. I haven't dealt with the case in a while, so I'm writing from memory, but I keep confusing Tex Watson with Bruce Davis. I think she knew both, but Bruce is the one I never liked. Csnt say why really.